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Author Topic: [FAQ]Targeting Sea Bass  (Read 8876 times)
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Hotrod
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« on: May 26, 2007, 08:18:38 AM »

Sure I caught my share of sea bass while on the reef targeting Fluke.  But what would be the approach to just targeting these guys..?

Bait / Location / Rig..Etc 
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ped579
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« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2007, 09:35:58 AM »

I would fish just the way you are.  The Sea Bass loves structure so any reef or rock out cropping would be good.  Jetties and groins are good for those who surf fish.  They love most crustaceans, mollusks, plus bunker. herring.

I am sure there will be guys that can give you more info.  I can remember one of the best places was the PP canal.  With all the rip rap around the bridges it was a natural for them.

Hope this helped Huh

Paul
« Last Edit: May 26, 2007, 10:11:09 AM by ped579 » Logged



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IrishAyes
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« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2007, 05:25:40 PM »

I like the Sea Girt reef area for seabass.  I found a small spot there that usually produces very good.  The spot is too small for a party boat to fish, therefore, it is not overfished.
Most any broken bottom, rocks, wreck, bridge rubble on the reef, ect will produce seabass.  Keep a good eye on your depth finder.
When you find a spot that looks good, stop the boat.  If I find there is a slow or no drift I don't bother with an anchor. I just drift over the spot and return to it when we are out of the fish.  If we get off of the fish too soon I will power past the spot, placing a marker out as I am pssing it.  I then anchor so the boat is positioned at the marker. 
For bait, I use small pieces of squid or clam.  Some days one is better than the other, so try to have them both on board.  I use a two or three hook rig with the sinker on the bottom.  At times i will use a diamond jig in place of the weight.  When you get a fish on, leave the line in the water for a minute or two and you will often get another fish or two jumping on your rig.
Fishing for the seabass is fun and the meat is delicious!
I use the same outfit that I use for fluke fishing, I just change the terminal end.
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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2011, 10:25:13 PM »

I personally go for sea bass out at the Shrewsbury Rocks, usually towards the back of the second buoy.  If you are looking for the rocks from atlantic high lands, go out around the hook and follow the coast down until you see 2 big buildings, 10 stories high, and look out from those buildings, and you will see a small can, and a big buoy. the rocks are in between there.  I usually anchor there, and if you use a sea bass rig, with the two or three hooks, cut small peices of clams and put that on as bait.  You drop your line, and as soon as it hits the bottom you will feel your bait get drilled, just get ready to quickly jerk your rod, and snag a fish.  Lots of fun and we usually catch our limit out there doing that.

Hope this was helpful and have fun!
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NJ Guy
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« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2011, 11:00:31 AM »

I personally go for sea bass out at the Shrewsbury Rocks, usually towards the back of the second buoy.  If you are looking for the rocks from atlantic high lands, go out around the hook and follow the coast down until you see 2 big buildings, 10 stories high, and look out from those buildings, and you will see a small can, and a big buoy. the rocks are in between there.  I usually anchor there, and if you use a sea bass rig, with the two or three hooks, cut small peices of clams and put that on as bait.  You drop your line, and as soon as it hits the bottom you will feel your bait get drilled, just get ready to quickly jerk your rod, and snag a fish.  Lots of fun and we usually catch our limit out there doing that.

Hope this was helpful and have fun!


i will deffinately give this spot a try later this week thanks for posting
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270 AmberJack "Sweet Emocean"
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« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2011, 11:16:44 AM »

Ask Birch from Fishguts - he's the seabass expert.  Poke are wrecks and rocks until you find them stacked up on your FF. Not all spots will hold seabass. If you don't anchor over the spot then short drifts, Hi-Low rigs with clams are best although small squid strips will work too.  You can also use a jig instead of a sinker on your hi-low rig but don't jig it like you are fishing for blues.  Just short up and down strokes.  Expect to get snagged.
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