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Author Topic: Winter Flounder Rigs  (Read 68685 times)
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Hotrod
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« on: February 05, 2008, 06:09:14 PM »

What do you use?  Pole / Tackle Etc...

Pix a plus Grin
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Bucktail
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« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2008, 01:07:24 AM »

Fishing for winter flounder doesn't require any fancy gear.  Almost any rod and reel combo in your arsenal will work as long as you don't go too heavy.  I like to fish as light as possible for these flatties.  And since most of my flounder fishing is done in less than 15' of water, I can usually get away with it.  My preferred outfit is a 5' to 6 1/2' light to medium light power rod and a small spinning or bait cast reel loaded with 6-10# braid. Berkley Fireline, Power Pro, Sufix and Stren Super Braid are all popular brands.  The combination of shallow water and the fact that none of these fish are going to make a long run, means you're not going to need a whole heck of a lot of braid on your reel. And since a lot of folks like to fish multiple rods when flounder fishing, this can save you a ton of money.  I would recommend a top shot of about 30 or 40 yards on each spool.  That means you can buy one 150-yard spool for about $15 and have enough to fill four rigs! (Photo A)

Terminal tackle is very simple as well.  A few hooks, some sinkers, and hardware are all you're going to need.  You can leave the top water plugs and butterfly jigs at home on this trip! (Although, I think that's a note for myself.)Grin

You can buy  pre-made flounder rigs at any bait shop, Dick's, or Wal-Mart.  Another option is to tie your own.  If you choose the latter you'll need to pick up the following:
  • two packages of snelled hooks (Chesterton, size 9 or 10)
  • a bag of small 3-way swivels
  • a bag of duo lock snaps (size 6)
  • some corn beads (if the snelled hooks don't already have them) (Photo B)
  • a bag of 1" - 1 1/2" curly tail grubs in yellow and/or chartreuse (Photo C)
  • a piece of small diameter surgical tubing (optional)


To tie your rig:
  • take two of the snelled hooks and add corn beads on the line (if not already supplied)
  • next, tie a small dropper loop in the middle of the leader.
  • slide a short, 2" section of the surgical tubing over the loop of the other snelled hook and onto the line (optional)
  • make a loop to loop connection by passing the end loop of the second snelled hook through the dropper loop on the first snelled hook and then bringing the second hook through its own end loop
  • then just slide the surgical tubing up over this connection.  This will make this connection neater and will add some stiffness there to help the two leaders stand out from each other.
  • loop your 3-way swivel to the end loop of the snell you made the dropper loop in.
  • attach the duo lock snap to the 3-way.
 
The finished rig should look something like photo D.

Are you with me so far?  My next post will be about sinkers and bait. Grin


* Photo A - Rod, Reel & Line.jpg (1207.07 KB, 533x400 - viewed 926 times.)

* Photo B - Corn Beads.jpg (1099.3 KB, 533x400 - viewed 979 times.)

* Photo C - Curly Tails.jpg (1228.77 KB, 533x400 - viewed 952 times.)

* Photo D - Finished Rig.jpg (1163.4 KB, 533x400 - viewed 3251 times.)
« Last Edit: February 12, 2009, 11:43:27 PM by Bucktail » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2008, 01:19:44 AM »

Sweet article,  This one is a keeper.  Thank You
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« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2008, 01:55:16 AM »

The last part of your terminal tackle is the sinker.  Bank style sinkers are preferred here.  On most days you can get away with 3 oz. or less.  I generally bring sinkers ranging from 1 1/2 - 4 oz. and will normally use the 2 or 3 oz.  Now plain, unpainted bank sinkers will work, but since flounder are very curious fish I believe that painting them a bright yellow helps in attracting them to my bait.  I can't say for sure that it works, but it gives me more confidence, so I do it.  I do know that flounder are very curious creatures (hence the bright curly tails and corn beads).  

I have, in the past, simply colored my sinkers with spray paint.  Unfortunately, I found that the color quickly wears off of these sinkers in just a few hours of bottom bouncing.  Last year I purchased a product called Grip & Guard, which is designed to add a textured rubber coating to tool handles and such.  I took a few of my sinkers and dipped them in this product.  I'll try them out this year and let you know how they hold up. Notice how scraped and faded the sinker is on the left side in the picture.  That one was painted with spray paint. (Photo E)

Once you've got all the necessary pieces in place you will need to bait up.  The best choices of bait for winter flounder are bloodworms, sandworms, clam, and sometimes mussels.  When using worms I find its best to thread them onto the hook, covering most of the shank.  Leave about a half-inch to an inch of the worm dangling from the end for more attraction.  (Photo F)
Usually I will add a thin strip of clam to this as extra enticement.  

Although once you get them going in your chum slick they may suck down anything you bait up with, there are times when winter flounder can be very picky.  As with all fishing, you may need to experiment with different baits or bait combinations.  
Some days you may find they hit the rigs with a chartreuse curly tail better than a yellow one.  Other times you may want to remove all of that extra stuff and give them a more natural presentation.  I plan on trying some Gulp! bloodworms this year in either red or chartreuse.  It may work.  It may not.  To me, one of the most fun things about fishing is  figuring out exactly what you need to do to get them to bite. Grin

As far as locations; a few good spots to try for winter flounder (from South to North) are Meyer's Hole (near the Barnegat Light), Oyster Creek (both outside the creek and inside off the Route 9 bridge), the park by the old Point Pleasant Hospital, and the docks by the tennis courts in Shark River.  I'm sure there are a bunch of guys on this site that know many more good locations. And who knows?  They might even be inclined to share them. Wink

A few things I haven't touched on that are equally important in putting together a good catch of these flatties are tides, the proper anchoring technique and chumming.  Hopefully, one of you flounder sharpies or Captains on this board can address these important topics in this thread.

Good Luck! thumbs up

-Bob


* Photo E - Sinkers.jpg (1227.62 KB, 533x400 - viewed 1061 times.)

* Photo F - Baited Rig.jpg (1163.51 KB, 533x400 - viewed 1974 times.)
« Last Edit: February 12, 2009, 11:38:09 PM by Bucktail » Logged

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« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2008, 05:50:23 AM »

 Grin
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« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2008, 07:17:39 AM »

Flounder rigs are one of the few rigs that I don't tie myself but rather I'll pick up a dozen or so pre tied rigs from The Outdoorsman (usually at one of the various fishing expos over the winter) as they are tied with Gamakatsu short shanked Chestertown style hooks. I prefer size #8 hooks.

One of my little tricks is to marinate the twister tails in clam juice the night before I head out to go flounder fishing. Makes for a nice little scent trail.


* 100_0501.jpg (3.99 KB, 533x400 - viewed 1189 times.)
« Last Edit: February 10, 2010, 08:16:05 AM by Hotrod » Logged
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« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2008, 07:23:09 AM »

Great info. Thanks for sharing guys
 thumbsup2
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« Reply #7 on: February 07, 2008, 07:39:03 AM »

As as far as rod/reels. I have 2 set ups for floundering.

#1 is a 6' Shimano Carbonex spinning rod matched with a Penn 4400SS reel spooled with #15 Power Pro.

#2 is a 6' Ugly Stick matched with a Penn 9 level wind also spooled with #15 Power Pro.

I have another rod that is able to handle somewhat heavier sinkers and fish when fishing the deeper waters of the Cedars.

Years ago I used to look forward to starting my flounder hunt sometime in March (depending on how cold/snowy the winter was) in the Shrewsbury River system. In years past you could always put a catch together at the Quay especially around the slack. In the past few years however with the Shrewsbury bite not being what it once was, I concentrate on the back bay (Keyport/Morgan Flats, mouth of the Rartian River, Round Shoal) starting in April. I'll gradually move over by the ammo pier. Sometimes Romer Shoals is hot and other years it's the Cedars in very late April/very early May.

When there at the Cedars, you need to get on them cause they'll be there for a few days or a week and then overnight they are gone.

In the river and bay I like using sandworms. I'll also use mussels at certain spots in the bay. At the Cedars I'll also try a clam strip. Sometimes a combo of a clam strip & sandworm is the ticket.

Another trick that I like to do is to add a set of hooks to my chum pot. Now some might not find this sporting but when I'm floundering fishing I'm looking for tasty fillets. Many times the biggest flounder of the day will come off the chum pot. I'll do this wheather I'm on a private or party boat (although a chum pot caught flounder is not pool eligible).

FYI, in the past I've made a trip up to Quincy Massachusetts for a weekend of flounder fishing (used to catch alot of good sized cod too). I'm talking flounder where the average size is close to 15"s with many in the 18-19" class. If anyone is interested, I can try and set something up. In the past I've usually went the first weekend in June.

Past Quincy trip


* Cod&Flounder060504.jpg (74.67 KB, 512x341 - viewed 1057 times.)
« Last Edit: February 12, 2009, 11:07:06 PM by Hotrod » Logged
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« Reply #8 on: February 07, 2008, 07:55:58 AM »

Great stuff guys! Keep it coming.  Grin
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« Reply #9 on: February 07, 2008, 08:35:09 AM »

good info bucktail... thumbs up

skolman is right you could just by pre made ones which are  goood quality...

i like they smaller black finish sproat hooks.

for shark river and manasquan any pole small conv or spinner will be fine for holding 1-4 ounces. up north a little heavier

chum and bait are really what will determine your success flounder pounding.

GREEN MUSSEL ARE THE FLOUNDER FAV
CORN
GRINDED CLAM

FROZEN IN NEWPAPER BAG FOR CHUM POTS


THEN THROW GREEN MUSSELS AND SURF CLAMS CRUSHED OVER THE SIDE..

Be patient as long as you are confident with your spot... its not uncommon to catch a bunch of flounder in small window of time when they turn on the more chum you got in the water the better.

its not uncommon for the flounder only to bite on one tide...

FOR BAIT

SANDWORMS, BLODDWORMS AND CLAMS ARE STANDARD.

GREEN SNOT MUSSELS (NOT BLACK) ARE GREAT AS WELL

TAPE WORMS ARE PROBABALY MY FAVORITE BAIT AND THEY USUALLY OUT PRODUCE ALL OF THE ABOVE... GETTING THEM IS A PAIN AND WILL LEAVE YOU WITH A SORE BACK BUT IS WORTH IT.... you must dig them at low tide and they are quick. keep them a live in a 5 gallon bucket of water, change often.

For artificial baits winter flounder is one of the few that GULP did not produce for me.

however Fishbites works amazing... blood worm immitation which really looks like tape worm...

small mr twister grub and miny shrimp work well as teasers in combo with bait....

After skippering teh normak flounder boats for 3 seasons and being on deck for 5 i still notice that the sharpies catch more flounder. they have the knack of short sinker bouncing which out produces the deadstick or high stick bouncing..

so go often and watch the sharpies flounder is a great fish to break the cabin fever....

hopefully we will be painted up by then, i will keep everyone posted... if not you will pronb see wayne and myself in the little camo







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« Reply #10 on: February 07, 2008, 09:19:30 AM »

Great info from all!  I'll be looking for you in your camo Jerry.  I'll either be on the Irish Ayes or my new to me 14'er.   thumbsup2
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« Reply #11 on: February 07, 2008, 09:22:23 AM »

ohhhhhh thumbs up nice 14' perfect for the little honey holes

good for you...

see you out there
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« Reply #12 on: February 07, 2008, 09:26:18 AM »

ohhhhhh thumbs up nice 14' perfect for the little honey holes



My thoughts exactly.   thumbsup2
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« Reply #13 on: February 07, 2008, 11:18:39 AM »

GREEN SNOT MUSSELS (NOT BLACK) ARE GREAT AS WELL

Are the schnizzile  thumbs up

Capt. Jerry, how do you keep the tapeworms from breaking? Every time I try to bait up with them they fragment apart.
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« Reply #14 on: February 08, 2008, 07:39:04 PM »

GREEN SNOT MUSSELS (NOT BLACK) ARE GREAT AS WELL

Are the schnizzile  thumbs up

Capt. Jerry, how do you keep the tapeworms from breaking? Every time I try to bait up with them they fragment apart.
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« Reply #15 on: February 10, 2008, 09:07:03 AM »

Very informative descriptions and detailed pictures.

Thanks guys!    thumbs up

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« Reply #16 on: February 10, 2008, 09:13:09 AM »

Will cime in with a Chum concocktion passed on from my Dad:

3 cans cheapo dog food, rice, corn, ground clams and tuna/bunker oil. mix up form 1 quart logs and freeze...............

Works out standing thumbsup2 thumbsup2 thumbsup2 thumbsup2

I also sweaten the slick with a mix of dry dog food/corn/rice every now and then thrown over thumbs up
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« Reply #17 on: February 10, 2008, 09:18:48 AM »

Put that concoction in an empty waxed cardboard milk quart container and freeze it.  Then you can just cut the milk container away when you go to use it.  Put it in a chum pot and your good to go .

Stacks easily in the freezer with no wasted space.
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« Reply #18 on: February 10, 2008, 07:58:45 PM »

GREEN SNOT MUSSELS (NOT BLACK) ARE GREAT AS WELL

Are the schnizzile  thumbs up

Capt. Jerry, how do you keep the tapeworms from breaking? Every time I try to bait up with them they fragment apart.

you gotta put the pitch fork under where the rest off of the tape worm is once you get a piece up.

with 2 guys one guy hold a piece out then the other pitch fork the rest out...

some still break...

once you get half out of the ground you can pull the rest out usually

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« Reply #19 on: February 11, 2008, 01:12:33 PM »

Gotta agree with the flounder master Capt Jerry P thumbsup2

Love Gulp, but even tipped with real bait they did not produce.  Only fish to pass it by, go figure 

Can't wait for some Raritan Bay flounder Grin
Bass too.  Stupid fish can't even shake a tiny flounder hook Roll Eyes



* Flounder3lb.jpg (40.79 KB, 321x360 - viewed 864 times.)

* FLOUNDER4280720006.jpg (149.4 KB, 533x400 - viewed 2243 times.)

* FlounderBass.jpg (59.2 KB, 430x400 - viewed 1211 times.)

* fluke_boo_boo.jpg (24.63 KB, 300x400 - viewed 923 times.)
« Last Edit: February 12, 2009, 11:08:30 PM by Hotrod » Logged


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